We’re Hiring: WSCF-NA Regional Executive – Advocacy and Solidarity Program Director

Letter of Call 

World Student Christian Federation North American Regional Executive
Advocacy and Solidarity Program Director

Download PDF: Letter of Call

The life of WSCF is based on local ecumenical groups of students called SCMs – Student Christian Movements – in universities and colleges who work, study and pray together. Presently there are 117 affiliated student groups in 94 countries, reaching out to over 2 million members worldwide. The North American Region is a fellowship of diverse ecumenical and denominational student Christian movements in Canada and the United States.

The WSCF seeks a regional staff person with a vision for nurturing dynamic ecumenical student movements in the US and Canada; committed to social justice; and desiring to work as part of an international team on global student concerns. This role will be under a 2-year contract with the opportunity to renew for a maximum of 8 years. Salary and Benefits are negotiable.

The North American Regional Executive and Program Director for Advocacy and Solidarity will serve as part of the WCSF’s staff team currently comprised of 7 executive staff – a General Secretary in the Inter-Regional Office (IRO) in Geneva (currently based in the Philippines), and the five other regional executives located in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Middle East and Asia-Pacific, and a Fundraising staff.

The Regional Executive is employed by WSCF’s Executive Committee and supervised by the North American Regional Committee (NARC). The WSCF Regional Executive is responsible for coordinating, managing, supporting, organizing, and expanding the WSCF activities in his/her region according to the WSCF Constitution and WSCF Executive Committee, and guidance from NARC.

Responsibilities:

The responsibilities of this role fall into five areas.

  • Organization & Communication
    • Coordination and oversight of the work of member movements in the region
    • Bi-lateral coordination with the Inter-Regional Office and other Regions
    • Implementation of initiatives from the Executive Committee and Regional Committee
    • Communication To relay information from the Inter-Regional Office to the national movements in the region
    • To participate in the Executive Committee and the Inter-Regional Programs
    • To facilitate communication between national movements, regional committees Executive Committee, Inter-Regional Office, and other regional offices
    • Building and maintaining new and existing relationships within the region including:
      • Youth Movements
      • Non-Governmental Organizations
      • Church Executive Bodies
      • Senior Friends
    • To articulate the WSCF vision and communicate with outside partners, ecumenical institutions, other student organizations,
    • To communicate with the Trustees of the Centennial Fund (WSCF endowment fund) in the region so as to facilitate accountability.
  • Project Planning
    • Coordination of meetings and programs for the Global Advocacy and Solidarity Committee
    • Support of National, Regional, and Federation programs
    • Preparation of project proposals, budgets, financial plans, project reports, financial reports and any other regional reports
  • Finance/Administration
    • Preparation of reports on regional administration and finances to the Inter-Regional Office, Executive Committee, and Regional Committee
    • Preparation of financial plans, budgets and actual expenditure reports along with the Treasurer and President.
    • Cultivating and pursuing fundraising opportunities with Churches, NGOs, and Non-Profits
    • Organization of yearly audits for regional accounts
    • Update files and records on regional administrative, and financial activities.
    • Escalation to the Inter-Regional Office and Regional Committee in the case of out-of-line situations
  • Personnel
    • Hiring, managing, and dismissing regional office support staff
    • Supervision of interns
    • Organization of regular meetings and trainings for the office and personnel,
  • Advocacy and Solidarity
    • Organization of  monthly online meetings with the WSCF Advocacy and Solidarity Committee (ASC)
    • Empowerment and coordination with regional Advocacy and Solidarity Chairs to plan regional AS work and liaise with the global committee
    • Communication with colleagues on the global staff team on issues relating to Advocacy and Solidarity in their regions and globally
    • Participation in global events/programs relating to Advocacy and Solidarity in regards with the Federation’s thematic priorities and the ASC’s work
    • Participation in the work of WSCF Preparatory Committees for global Inter-regional Leadership Training Programs where Advocacy and Solidarity has relevance
    • To liaise with the Interfaith Taskforce at the UN in New York and to coordinate WSCF UN work
    • Fundraising for the WSCF Advocacy and Solidarity programs and initiatives

Application Submission Information & Details

Qualifications: Preferred candidates for this position should have the following qualifications.

  • A minimum of a Bachelor’s from an accredited University
  • Relevant job experience

Location: The Regional Office is currently located in New York, New York. Staff have the option to work remotely and will not be required to relocate to New York City. Relocation of the office will also be negotiated after its lease is complete.

Travel: This position includes travel to National, Regional, and Global events. Travel can be expected for 30-40% of the year.

Compensation: As mentioned above, salary and benefits will be negotiated. The Executive Committee of the Federation will finalize staff salaries and the Regional Committee will calculate their contribution based on the cost-of-living, experience, and regional capabilities.

Please submit the following materials by October 20, 2017. The position will remain open until filled.

  • Resume
  • Cover letter
  • Personal Statement 500-1000 words (this can be about your faith, theology, or social justice journey)

Logan B. Boese
President | World Student Christian Federation North American Regional Committee
Chair |North American Regional Executive Search Committee

Electronically: loganboese@gmail.com

Logan Boese
3005 Triverton Pike Dr.
Fitchburg, WI U.S.A. 53711
Apt. 205

The Un-Settling Work of Indigenous Solidarity: A North American Perspective

By Jacqueline Sookermany, SCM Canada

For four days this June a small group of students and WSCF/SCM staff members gathered in my resident city of Winnipeg, Canada for the Indigenous Solidarity Program, where we spent time learning about Indigenous culture from Indigenous members of the community and explored what it means to stand in solidarity with our Indigenous neighbours. Winnipeg is not a common travel destination and has a reputation for being cold and inhospitable for much of the year (with a nickname like Winterpeg there isn’t a lot of tourist draw), but with the highest provincial population of Indigenous people in Canada, and 40% of that population living in the city of Winnipeg, it is a unique space well suited for a conference of this nature. With the mix of cultures and communities in this small city has to offer, there are rich resources for learning about Indigenous culture, learning from Indigenous communities, and exploring the ways in which settlers and the Indigenous communities have come together to work toward reconciliation, as well as to hear from the communities where we, as settlers, have more work to do.

Our group was a diverse mix of settlers born in North America (6 from Canada, 1 from the US) and more recent settlers (from the UK, Italy, and Nigeria), each bringing their own perspectives and experience from their personal, educational and professional backgrounds. The diversity of our group allowed us to expand our definition of what Indigenous culture and solidarity looks like and to make connections slightly beyond the North American Indigenous scope to look at Indigenous issues in Nigeria and issues facing the African-American communities in the US. These stories added depth to our discussions about what solidarity and activism looks like beyond our immediate context, while also showing the ways in which each community faces their own distinct struggles in overcoming colonization, corrupt power structures, and discrimination.

We began our conference learning about the land we would be calling home for the next four days, Canadian Mennonite University. Our first speakers, Annika Reynar and Michael Veith, shared the history of the land we were on with us, a history spanning from its original inhabitants– the Saulteaux and Cree Nations– and the earliest settlers of the Selkirk Treaty to the present day University and its adjoined urban farm. We also discussed the problems of placeness and story when taken out of context or prescribed unfit meaning; how truth can get lost when we lose the collectiveness of storytelling and history keeping and instead focus on our own perspective fragments of the whole. Starting our time together sitting on the University’s farm, hearing part of the story of how we came to be there, parts of the story that we wouldn’t have thought of otherwise, set the tone for the rest of the week-understanding that our stories as settlers goes far beyond the spans of our own lives. In addition to our introduction to the land, the following morning we were graciously welcomed to the land by Elder Theodore Fountaine, who would later share his own story of residential schools, as well as his vision of what Canada’s reconciliation should look like.

Through the remainder of the week there was sharing from other conference participants including the journey of the Christian Peacemaker Teams’ Pilgrimage for Indigenous Rights and a bible study focusing on reconciliation (from the text: 1Kings 21:1-1). We also heard from our other guests, such as Indigenous artist Heather Bjorklund, who led our group in Indigenous storytelling, drama, and dance exercises and Adrienne Leitch, who spoke to us about the documentary project she collaborated on, Reserve 107, which looks at community facilitated reconciliation efforts between rural Saskatchewan settlers and the Young Chippewayan Nation members whose land they live on. During our conversation cafe and Senior Friends event facilitated by Elder Fountaine, we heard about Elder Fountaine’s experience in Residential schools and how his time there
impacted his family and relationships throughout his life. He shared with us some reading from his book, Broken Circle, and told us about his vision for repairing relationships between Canadian settlers/government and Indigenous peoples. The conversation cafe was also a time for people to share their experiences, ask questions, and to showcase an art project featuring the 94 Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission embroidered onto Canadian flags. This session was very moving and it was an honour to listen and share with Elder Fountaine.

One of the most impactful experiences for me was walking with the Bear Clan Patrol- a group of community members who patrol Winnipeg’s North End every evening to pick up drug paraphernalia and check in with community members. We started our evening attending a weekly event called Meet Me at the Bell Tower- a community check in where North End community members rally together to end violence and poverty in the community. We were able to participate in a smudge and drum song there, before heading out on patrol.

Walking through a part of my city that I rarely go to, with people who are invested, passionate, and knowledgeable about their community was inspiring. Seeing how Bear Clan members make a conscious effort to reach out to every person they pass while on patrol and how trusted they are in their community as service members and friends was a prime example of what it means to be an active member of community and how we can create change through relationships and intentionality.

Sharing in these experiences and learning along side each of the amazing people who participated in the Indigenous Solidarity Program was a blessing. Being able to take on the role of listener and learner as part of my journey of activism and social justice work was so important, as these roles can sometime be put on the back burner. This experience renewed my commitment to stand beside and not in front of my Indigenous friends and neighbours, creating space for them to speak into our shared community and advocating for their leadership in solidarity work.

Celebration of WSCF Canada & Luciano Kovacs

You are Invited!

Come and hear about the work of the World Student Christian Federation in North America: an anti-oppressive ecumenical community of students and young adults from Canada and the USA, committed to the radical and prophetic words of Jesus Christ.

We will celebrate the work of Luciano Kovacs, North America staff, who is completing 10 years of work this year.

Join SCM Canada staff, ecumenical colleagues, friends and comrades for refreshments and conversation!

September 21, 2017, 7-9 p.m.
Christie Gardens
Recreation Room, Lower Level
600 Melita Crescent, Toronto

RSVP – andersonbetsy528@gmail.com or 416-656-6064

WSCF highlighted by UN in Faith-based Organization Spotlight

The United Nations Inter-agency Task Force on Religion and Development is providing a new series of ‘FBO Spotlights’ on faith-based organizations who have UN NGO accreditation; have worked with UN entities; have active programmes promoting and supporting human rights in countries; and are working on Sustainable Development Goals-related efforts.

This month, they are shedding light on the World Student Christian Federation.

Here is the write up:

The World Student Christian Federation (WSCF) is a global community of Christian students and young adults as well as other members of the academic community dating back to 1895. WSCF is  the oldest and one of the first and foremost International Ecumenical Student organizations of the world. WSCF has more than 100 national members known as SCMs (Student Christian Movements) across the globe in six regions. The WSCF Inter-regional Offices are based in Geneva and Manila, Philippines and the six regional offices are based in Asia (Hong Kong), Africa (Nairobi), Europe (Trento, Italy), Latin America and Caribbean (Buenos Aires), Middle East (Beirut) and North America (New York). WSCF has  consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (UN ECOSOC), the Department of Public Information (DPI), the Human Rights Council and UNESCO.

The WSCF is a global community of Student Christian Movements committed to dialogue, ecumenism, social justice and peace. Our mission is to empower students in critical thinking and constructive transformation of our world being a space for prayer and celebration, theological reflection, study, and analysis of the social and cultural process, solidarity and action across boundaries of culture, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity.  The WSCF is called to be a prophetic witness in Church and society. The vision is nurtured by a radical hope for God’s reign in history.

The WSCF focuses its work through programs and cross-cutting strategies as identified at its General Assembly held in Bogota, Colombia in February/March 2015 on the theme “We are Many We Are One, Sent Out to Build God’s Peace”. The five programs are Eco-Justice (economic, ecological, climate justice for the whole inhabited world), Higher Education, Identity Diversity and Dialogue with a focus on Human Sexuality, Gender and LGBTQ Rights, Overcoming Violence and Peacemaking with a focus on the Middle East and Interfaith Dialogue and Solidarity. WSCF’s Strategic Areas include Biblical and Theological Analysis, Advocacy and Solidarity, Ecumenical Transformative Diakonia with a focus on Migrant Justice, Capacity Development and Movement Building.

Upcoming WSCF projects include:

  • A WSCF-North America Indigenous Solidarity Program to be held in Winnipeg, Canada on June 15-19
  • An Interfaith Youth Conference on Peacemaking and Overcoming Violence in the Middle East to be held in Cairo, Egypt on August 1-5, 2017
  • An interfaith, intergenerational and intersectional feminist theology conference to be held in Edmonton, Canada on October 20-22, 2017
  • An Inter-regional Leadership Training Program on Identity Diversity and Dialogue with a focus on theology and LGBTQ rights to be held at venue to be determined in Asia in the November/December 2017

 

Indigenous Solidary Conversation Cafe featuring Theodore Fontaine

 

Theodore (Ted) Fontaine is a member and former chief of the Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba. He graduated in civil engineering from the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology in 1973 and went on to work in the corporate, government, and First Nations sectors, including eleven years with the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs as an advisor and executive director.

This powerful memoir documents the physical, psycho-logical, and sexual abuse he experienced at the Fort Alexander and Assiniboia Indian Residential Schools in Manitoba during the 1940s and ’50s. The story’s hopeful ending sets an inspirational example for generations of First Nations following a similar path.

Theodore is a regular speaker and media commentator on Indian residential schools and has presented his best-selling memoir, Broken Circle, to more than 350 audiences in Canada and the United States. He continues to break new ground by supporting survivors and by seeking reconciliation directly with those who were perpetrators of his abuse. Theodore lives with his wife, Morgan, in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Indigenous Solidarity Trip: June 15-19

Indigenous-Solidarity-Trip-Small

Organized by WSCF-NA in partnership with SCM Canada, the Indigenous Solidarity Trip will take place in Winnipeg, Manitoba, from June 15 – 19. Around 15-20 students and young adults from across Canada and the United States will be immersed in issues of racial justice and right relations, Indigenous solidarity, Indigenous theology and theologies of settlers’ solidarity, economic and eco-justice for indigenous people, mass incarceration of Indigenous people in Canada, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Residential Schools in Canada and other relevant topics.

Canada’s recent conclusion of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission came with 97 recommendations for reconciliation for the Canadian public to pursue. Three in particular pertained to the church. In response to this reality, and in alignment with the WSCF NA’s thematic pursuit of racial justice and Indigenous solidarity, we have proposed to have an allies learning trip in Winnipeg, Manitoba. As this area hosts a high population of Indigenous peoples, as well as considerable allies and reconciliation efforts, it is a ripe space for learning.

The program will include a mix of educational activities (conference-style keynotes, workshops and working groups), exposure outings, biblical and theological reflections on the theme, and recommendations for advocacy work on Indigenous solidarity. The program will involve students active in local universities and seminaries as well as young adults from congregations located in the area. Partnership with activist organizations such as the Mennonite Church Canada, Christian Peacemaker Teams and the Indigenous Family Centre will be integral to the program. Participants will also engage in Indigenous solidarity activities and in turn, once back home, will educate others regarding Indigenous issues, promoting activism and advocacy locally and nationally.

What? Indigenous Solidarity Trip
When? June 15 – 19
Where? Canadian Mennonite University, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Treaty 1 Territory, home of the Ojibwe, Cree and Metis Nations
What? Workshops will include: Colonization in Canada, Addressing Privilege, Playback Theatre,  UNDRIP’s work with Bill C262, Visits to Indigenous Family Centre & Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Ceremony at the Sandy-Saulteaux Spiritual Centre (UCC)
How? Please apply by filling out the Registration Form. Applications should be in by May 25.

Senior Friends’ Gathering Reflection

Alice Hoaglund attended the Senior Friends’ Gathering in Berkeley, CA on March 24. Here is her reflection from that experience. 

From the time Peter Haresnape, SCM Canada General Secretary welcomed me, throughout the 8 hours when Luciano Kovacs bade me goodbye, I had the warm  feeling of being among Federation friends Friday, March 24, at the Senior Friends gathering in Berkeley.  This is a short time to compare one day with 60 years ago when I had the privilege of serving two years as European Secretary, WSCF, living in and traveling from Geneva, Switzerland, following several years in the student Christian movement in the U.S.  The current theme of the LTP conference, “Resisting Empire,” sounded like the intensity and commitment which characterized the Federation long ago.

Timeliness was another commonality which I felt as we gathered then and now for regional and international conferences.  The global outlook was broadening for us as we spoke of conflicts we faced between different parts of the world.  The 50’s weren’t that far from World War II so we could still experience the attitudes that existed among nations. This made the Federation such an important movement for bringing reconciliation as a key concept in our discussions.  The subject of sexuality was definitely a different,  though not unfamiliar, conversation. The theme of a 1952 Student World quarterly was “Man and Woman.”

Ecumenical  was a current subject then on local and national levels.  Related to this was the founding of the World Council of Churches in 1948.  Not forgotten was the amazing history preceding it, the birth of the WSCF in l895. This did not seem important to students, maybe not then nor now.  For us old-timers, it is something we don’t want the Movement to forget.  In the changing world of our day the need of interfaith understanding and common goals is part of our vocabulary.  This term during one of the workshops  added to the timeliness of the discussion.  At the same time, the grounding of local SCM’s in Bible study and worship remains basic.  I am sorry I missed the study of Exodus 32 at the beginning of the LTP conference.  Our international office in Geneva brought us in close cooperation with a Roman Catholic World Service organization.  Our staff bookkeeper Yusef was a devout Russian Orthodox.

The words on Peter’s T-shirt struck me as a banner theme for the life of the Federation.  Now if I could only recall exactly what they were?  Easier to remember are the lines at the close of Luciano‘s correspondence, “In Christ, In Solidarity,”

Alice Hoaglund

Transforming young adults into Christian leaders

By Linda Bloom
Originally published at umc.org

This week, Jacey Johnson, a United Methodist working on a Master of Divinity degree, will get a taste of what community organizing is all about — from both a theological and practical perspective.

The 24-year-old student at United Methodist Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington is among the participants attending a leadership-training program organized by the Student Christian Movement-USA and its parent body, the World Student Christian Federation-North America. The participants come from the United States, Canada and a few other countries.

While the focus is on promoting social justice in today’s world, Johnson is part of a strong United Methodist connection that dates all the way back to the federation’s founding in 1895. John R. Mott, a U.S. Methodist layman who later won the Nobel Peace Prize, was one of six founders and also served as the federation’s chief executive.

The March 23-26 gathering at the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California, is the fifth annual such event, said Luciano Kovacs, the North American branch’s regional secretary.

Through this ongoing program, young adults “reflect theologically and biblically as well as social-politically” on the different themes explored by the federation, he explained, and learn how to foster ecumenical dialogue in their own regions.

The various trainings offered through the World Student Christian Federation-North America also are a project of The Advance, the voluntary giving program of The United Methodist Church.

Annie Solis, who lives in the Peruvian Andes, first became involved with the federation and the Student Christian Movement in 2014. A member of the Methodist Church of Peru and its Working Group on Climate Justice, the 33-year-old attended a preparatory meeting in Lima, Peru, for the U.N. climate summit in Paris and later spoke at a training on ecojustice organized by the World Student Christian Federation Latin America and Caribbean region.

In March, Solis was part of a 12-member delegation from all regions of the federation to the 61st U.N. Commission on the Status of Women. The federation holds accreditation at the United Nations.

“Being part of a global delegation allowed me to know more about what the Christian students are doing and facing in their own contexts, either at school, work and faith communities, and their particular challenges regarding gender equality,” she told United Methodist News Service.

Solis finds gender injustice to be a “global burden” even in faith communities. However, she said, “we can take the first step discussing this issue in our communities and inviting our young friends to this conversation promoting a call to action toward healthier relationships and equal participation of men and women of all ages.”

READ FULL ARTICLE AT UMC.ORG